Ever tried to describe your own book? Chances are you have, and chances are you found it a difficult and unpleasant experience. If you’re taking the traditional publishing route, you must write a query letter or prepare an elevator pitch. If you’re self-publishing, you must write your book blurb or back cover copy. And either way—it’s hard. You’d think it would be simple to describe something you’ve been working on for months—but it isn’t.

This is why there’s now a growing industry of pros who will write your book description for you. Just as you can hire out the editing or the cover design, you can get someone to write book blurbs. And if you can afford it, this is not a bad idea. We tend to get too close to our own work. Sometimes, ego gets in the way. It can be useful to have an objective third party who didn’t write the book, doesn’t have any darlings, and is simply making an objective attempt to get readers interested in reading and buying the book.

Here are a few guidelines if you decide to write your own description. Employ strategic formatting. Remember that the visual appearance of words is an important part of readability. Remember that most people don’t actually read webpages (like the ones on Amazon)—they scan them. Long paragraphs, big blocks of text, get ignored. Short paragraphs look friendlier. Visual tricks—boldface, italics, bullet points—if not used excessively—can make your text more visually appealing and can make key words stand out.

Most of all, remember that you are not writing this for yourself. The point is not to gratify your literary inclinations. The point is to sell books. You should always be answering the reader’s question: What’s in this for me? In nonfiction, the answer will be topics of interest or potential benefit. In fiction, it will be tapping plots, tropes, and character archetypes, that appeal to the reader. What’s on your reader’s Id List? (If you’re not sure what I mean by this, listen to Red Sneaker Writers podcast 008 with psychologist Jennifer Lynn Barnes.) What will trigger readers’ interest and inspire them to give your book a chance?

Formatting is flexible, but here’s a useful structure that might help you get started and prevent you from leaving out anything important:

  • Headline-Open with a hook, something short and intriguing that immediately captures the reader’s interest.
  • Hero-Identify the sympathetic or empathetic lead character you want the reader to cheer for.
  • Opponent-Identify who or what prevents your hero from obtaining their goal.
  • McGuffin-What is it your hero (and possibly others) want? What is the goal or desire that motivates the key players in the story?
  • Stakes-What happens if the hero does not succeed, or the opponent gets their way? As you may know from reading Powerful Premise, stories are more compelling when the stakes are high.
  • Social proof-Provide sales figures, quotes from other authors, reviews, list rankings, or similar successful titles.
  • Call to Action-Tell the reader what to do. The best one is “Click here.” If the reader is already on your Amazon page, this may not be necessary. They probably know what to do there.

And hey—was this list easier to read (or scan) because I added bullet points? And boldface? Of course it was.

Also note that if you’re posting on Amazon, you may need to use “coding enhancers” to make the description turn out right. You can find these at Amazon Author Central. For instance, to indicate boldface text, you insert: <b>

Ok, let’s test the system. This is the book description for my novel The Game Master, and if you’re wondering, I chose that one because it sold more eBooks in the first three months than anything I’ve ever written. Here’s the description:

It’s not whether you live or die, it’s how you play the game.

While in Vegas for the American Poker Grand Slam, BB Thomas—the Game Master—is suddenly arrested by the FBI and taken to a top-secret laboratory. A scientist has been murdered in a bizarre manner, and BB’s daughter has been kidnapped. Reluctantly joining forces with his ex-wife, Linden, BB plunges into a labyrinthine mystery incorporating the world’s oldest and best-known games and taking them to Paris, Dubai, Pyongyang, and Alexandria. Pursued by a relentless FBI agent and an unknown assailant who wants him stopped at any cost, BB races to uncover an insidious plot involving secret societies, ancient cover-ups, and savage vengeance. Someone is playing a deadly game, and the object is the destruction of every government on the face of the earth—no matter how many people die in the process.

William Bernhardt is the bestselling author of…

Now I’ll annotate the sections:

(Headline) It’s not whether you live or die, it’s how you play the game.

While in Vegas for the American Poker Grand Slam, (Hero) BB Thomas—the Game Master—is suddenly arrested by the FBI and taken to a top-secret laboratory. A scientist has been murdered in a bizarre manner, and (McGuffin) BB’s daughter has been kidnapped. Reluctantly joining forces with his ex-wife, Linden, BB plunges into a labyrinthine mystery incorporating the world’s oldest and best-known games and taking them to Paris, Dubai, Pyongyang, and Alexandria. Pursued by (Opponents) a relentless FBI agent and an unknown assailant who wants him stopped at any cost, BB races to uncover an insidious plot involving secret societies, ancient cover-ups, and savage vengeance. Someone is playing a deadly game, and (Stakes) the object is the destruction of every government on the face of the earth—no matter how many people die in the process.

(Social Proof) William Bernhardt is the bestselling author of…

The Call to Action, of course, was implicitly urging readers to click the adjoining Buy button.

See how easy it is? You can do this—in about twenty drafts. And after you think you’ve got it, take a few days then come back to revisit it. You’ll probably find ways to improve it. But you can do this. Done well, this can drastically improve your book sales.